Studies: climate change is causing increases in stress, depression and negative mental health

This article discusses how climate change is causing increases in stress, depression and negative mental health, study shows. Women and people on low incomes are more likely to report mental health problems due to weather.

Mental health has already been impacted by events linked to climate change, such as multi-year temperature warming, increased rainfall and extreme weather events, a new study shows.

Scientists analysed data from nearly two million US residents who reported the state of their mental health for 30 days with the US Centres for Disease Control and Prevention between 2002 and 2012, coupling this with climate data.

On average, months with temperatures above 30C or more than 25 days of rainfall saw increased reports of stress, depression and “problems with emotions”, scientists said in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Nick Obradovich, the study’s co-author and Massachusetts Institute of Technology research scientist, said: “It’s really important to consider this as yet another piece in the puzzle of understanding how climate change will influence society, and the conclusion here is that it’s not likely to be good.”

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