A third of all food in the U.S. gets wasted. Fixing that could help fight climate change.

Washington Post: A third of all food in the U.S. gets wasted. Fixing that could help fight climate change. The carbon footprint of food waste is greater than that of the airline industry.

I have a gross confession: Last week, when I cleaned out my fridge for the first time in I’d-rather-not-say-how-long, I found some slimy spinach, a jar of salsa gone moldy, the soured dregs of a pint of yogurt and a ball of leftover cookie dough I forgot to bake. All of it went in the trash.

I felt awful, because I’ve reported on how food waste contributes to climate change. More than a third of all food grown for human consumption in the United States never makes it to someone’s stomach, according to the nonprofit ReFED. That’s about $408 billion worth of food, grown on 18 percent of U.S. farmland with 4 trillion tons of water.

The carbon footprint of U.S. food waste is greater than that of the airline industry. Globally, wasted food accounts for about 8 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions. The environmental consequences of producing food that no one eats are massive.

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